Exploring the Kingsroad

Borgund Stave Church

Description

Borgund Stave Church is the country’s most authentic and well-preserved of its kind.

It has been used as a model for the restoration of other stave churches.

The timber for Borgund Stave Church was felled in winter 1180–1181, and the church is believed to have been completed shortly after. It is usually dated to sometime between 1150 and 1200.

The earliest written record of the church is from 1331, then as «Mathios kirkia j Borghund». Today, it is believed that is was dedicated to St. Andreas.

The stave church was in use until 1868, when new Borgund church was completed close by. Its churchyard is still in use.

Most of the medieval construction technique has been preserved. It features a nave, chancel, and apse with surrounding portico, and with raised central nave and chancel with gable roof. 

There is also a detached belfry nearby, which today serves both the churches. This dates back to the Middle Ages, and is the only one of its kind left in Norway.

Some of its materials are believed to be older than the stave church.

The church stands on its original foundations. In 1969 and 1986, archaeological surveys revealed building material believed to stem from an earlier church.

Today, the stave church is a popular tourist attraction and a national treasure.

A visitor centre opened nearby in 2009. To access the stave church, museum, café, and toilet facilities, you have to buy a ticket at the visitor centre,